Raising Cane’s Ross Ave Drive Thru

I love Raising Cane’s fried chicken fingers. I don’t leave Old East Dallas for any random reason, but I will drive to Lovers and Greenville just to grab some Cane’s chicken strips more often than I care to admit. That said, I have mixed feelings about the new Cane’s going up on Ross Ave.

I’ve complained enough about Ross on this forum. But to sum up my frustration with how we develop the Eastside, I’m extremely disappointed with the design and form of the most important corridor that links Downtown to East Dallas. We have had the opportunity to extend the greatness of Lowest Greenville, but we’ve chosen to replicate Coit and Campbell. And the brand new Raising Cane’s drive thru is case in point of wasted opportunity.

pjimage

Before and during construction

To make numbers up to prove a point, let’s say that the new location will bring in 500 cars per day, so over 7 days a week and 52 weeks a year, that would be 182,000 cars per year that will come in and out of this location, where previously there was no activity at all, in addition to the car traffic that currently passes through this section of Ross (19,387/day in 2002 according to the city). The question I have is: will this facility produce enough tax revenue to make up for the traffic wear and tear on the roads that serve it?

I did a quick analysis of two properties on Lowest Greenville: a traditional development vs a modern drive thru.

Slide1

According to 2016 data from DCAD.org, the traditional development yields a 90% higher return on property tax yield and has increased in value more than 100% over a decade, as opposed to the drive thru that decreased in value by 14% over the same period of time. I calculated the value over an acre to imagine what a neighborhood of these types of developments would look like financially.

If our goal is to build wealth in our city that is quickly losing value, then Raising Cane’s drive thru development is nothing more than a band aid over a gushing laceration. Dallas needs creative solutions to solve our myriad financial problems. While not providing a quick fix, reforming how we develop our land will be similar to establishing healthier habits to stave off larger medical bills down the road.

In the end, Cane’s will have my business, as Taco Cabana already does, but the dopamine starts and ends with fried chicken, and not with civic pride.

Advertisements

A Higher Standard for Ross Avenue

I just got back from New York City where I completed a pilgrimage to Hell’s Kitchen. The wife and I have been enjoying Daredevil on Netflix, whose antagonist is a real estate developer using crime to finance various “revitalization projects” throughout the neighborhood. So we wanted to see what the actual Hell’s Kitchen looks like and how real life has inspired Daredevil.

Like so many other cities, including Dallas, we found old buildings destroyed in favor of larger, high-end construction in Hell’s Kitchen. Unlike many other cities, however, I actually like the way that these buildings look.
hell's kitchen

On the ground floor, these buildings make sense at the human scale. But in order to satisfy the checklist for multi-million dollar financing, this building accommodates the hundreds of units needed above eye-level. Most importantly for current zoning and financing requirements, the building also features multilevel parking.

Further down the 10th Avenue from this development, we found the Hell’s Kitchen Park that was perfect in size with a splash pad that many people were enjoying.
image

image

Not all buildings have to be beautiful, but this one is practical and functional. It even has underground parking!
image

image

I couldn’t help but that 10th Avenue could serve as a model for development on Ross Avenue. Like 10th Ave, Ross Ave is a very important thoroughfare that many people use for many different purposes. Unlike 10th Ave, however, new development on Ross caters to people passing through the neighborhood.

I know that development is going to happen, and I personally don’t have the means or energy to stop change from happening. On the other hand, I hope that people do want well designed places and that this helps to contribute to that conversation.

If development is going to happen, why not make sure it looks better? If the financing is out there and the money needs to be used, why not make development attractive?